Nov 132010
 

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This is closer to a foccaccia dough than a traditional pizza dough. it’s chewier and saltier, which we prefer.

  1. dissolve 2 1/2 tsp fresh or dry yeast in 1 cup warm (body temperature) water. use the inside of your wrist to gauge the water. if the water feels neither hot nor cold on your wrist, it’s close to body temperature.
  2. add 1 1/2 tsp salt, 2 tbsp olive oil, and a pinch of sugar
  3. stir in 2 cups of flour. you can also use up to one cup of cornmeal. keep adding flour until you can’t stir any more.
  4. dump the dough out on a floured surface and knead for 5 minutes, keep adding flour to control stickiness. eventually it should not be sticky at all.
  5. for pizza: put the dough in a bowl oiled with olive oil, turn over to coat. cover with a towel and let rise for 30-40 minutes.
  6. divide dough in half pat into ovals about 1/2″ thick.
  7. brush with olive oil, sprinkle with salt, add toppings.
  8. let rise 20 minutes.
  9. bake at 375 until golden brown on bottom and edges

If you want to make focaccia instead of pizza, at step 5 take a large baking sheet or oven tray and coat with plenty of olive oil. dump the dough in there and spread it as flat as you can.After 30-45 minutes come back for a visit. The dough will be more relaxed than before. Pour a lot of olive oil on it. Push straight down on it with all of your fingers and convince it to spread out onto the whole pan. Leave finger holes on it. Sprinkle with fresh rosemary, salt, caramelized onions, olives… push them down roughly into the dough. Let it rise again as long as possible.

Focaccia is “over-risen” dough, so the longer you leave it the fluffier it will be. You can let it rise for 3 hours.

Bake for 20 minutes until you see some golden brown.

 

 2010/11/13  Posted by on 2010/11/13 Tagged with: